Categories
Healthcare Analytics Information Systems OpenSource

OHDSI OMOP to FHIR mapper

TL;DR Below is an open-source common-line tool for converting an OHDSI OMOP cohort (defined in ATLAS) to a FHIR bundle and vice versa.

Originally published by Bell Eapen at nuchange.ca on July 22, 2020. If you have some feedback, reach out to the author on Twitter,  LinkedIn or  Github.

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OHDSI OMOP CDM is one of the most popular clinical data models for health data warehouses. The simple, but clinically motivated data structure is intuitively appealing to clinicians leading to its good adoption. In this respect, it has overtaken HL7-V3 which is more robust but has a steeper learning curve, especially for clinicians. The OHDSI OMOP CDM is widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for drug monitoring.

FHIR is emerging as the defacto standard for health system interoperability, owing largely to its simplicity and the use of existing and popular standards such as REST. As NoSQL databases become more and popular in healthcare, FHIR can also be a good persistence schema. It aligns well with search technologies such as elasticsearch.

As both standards are popular, conversion from one to the other may be commonly required. Researchers at Georgia Tech have an open-source tool – GT-FHIR2 – for mapping an existing OHDSI OMOP CDM database as FHIR endpoint. However, conversion between existing systems may not be easy with a full-stack solution. 

I have a simpler solution that I believe will be useful in the following scenarios:

  • To export a cohort to a FHIR based analytics tool.
  • To load new resources to OMOP CDM databases for incremental ETL.

Omopfhirmap is a command-line tool for mapping a OHDSI cohort, defined in ATLAS, to a FHIR bundle that can be optionally submitted to a FHIR server for processing. Conversely, it can process a FHIR bundle and add resources to an existing CDM database ignoring duplicates. Unlike GT-FHIR2, the OMOP on FHIR Project at Georgia Tech omopfhirmap does not expose OMOP database as FHIR endpoints. 

I have used spring-boot and JPA for easy wiring of services and abstraction of database and the hapi-fhir as it is an obvious choice for any java based FHIR applications. It is still work in progress and any help will be appreciated (Refer to CONTRBUTING.md).

Categories
Health Research Methodology Healthcare Analytics

OHDSI OMOP CDM ETL Tools in Python, .Net and Go

TL;DR Here are few OHDSI OMOP CDM tools that may save you time if you are developing ETL tools!

Originally published by Bell Eapen at nuchange.ca on June 11, 2020. If you have some feedback, reach out to the author on Twitter,  LinkedIn or  Github.

Python: pyomop | pypi
.NET: omopcdmlib | NuGet
Golang: gocdm

eHealth Programmer Girl
OHDSI OMOP CDM Libraries

The COVID-19 pandemic brought to light many of the vulnerabilities in our data collection and analytics workflows. Lack of uniform data models limits the analytical capabilities of public health organizations and many of them have to re-invent the wheel even for basic analysis. As many other sectors embrace big data and machine learning, many healthcare analysts are still stuck with the basic data wrenching with Excel.

The OHDSI OMOP CDM (Common data model) for observational data is a popular initiative for bringing data into a common format that allows for collaborative research, large-scale analytics, and sharing of sophisticated tools and methodologies. Though OHDSI OMOP CDM is primarily for patient-centred observational analysis, mostly for clinical research, it can be used with minor tweaks for public health and epidemiologic data as well. We have written about some of the technical details here.

The OHDSI OMOP CDM is relatively simple and intuitive for clinical teams than emerging standards such as FHIR. Though the relational database approach and some of the software tools associated with OHDSI OMOP CDM are archaic, the data model is clinically motivated. There is an ecosystem of software tools for many of the analytics tools that can be used out of the box. The Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP) CDM, now in its version 6.0, has simple but powerful vocabulary management. OHDSI OMOP CDM is a good choice for healthcare organizations moving towards health data warehousing and OLAP.

One weakness of OHDSI is the lack of tools for efficient ETL from existing EHR and HIS. Converting existing EHR data to the CDM is still a complex task that requires technical expertise. During the additional “home time” during the COVID pandemic, I have created three software libraries for ETL tool developers. These libraries in Python, .NET and Golang encapsulated the V6.0 CDM and helps in writing and reading data from a variety of databases with the V6.0 tables. The libraries also support creating the CDM tables for new databases and loading the vocabulary files.

Python: pyomop | pypi
.NET: omopcdmlib | NuGet
Golang: gocdm


These libraries might save you some time if you are building scripts for ETL to CDM. They are all open-source and free to use in your tools. Do give me a shout if you find these libraries useful and please star the repositories on GitHub.

Categories
Healthcare Analytics OpenSource Resources

OSCAR EMR EForm Export (CSV) to FHIR

This is a simple application to convert a CSV file to a FHIR bundle and post it to a FHIR server in Golang. The OSCAR EMR has an EForm export tool that exports EForms to a CSV file that can be downloaded. This tool can load that CSV file to a FHIR server for consolidated analysis. This tool can be used with any CSV, if columns specified below (CSV format section) are present.

Use Cases

This is useful for family practice groups with multiple OSCAR EMR instances. Analysts at each site can use this to send data to a central FHIR server for centralized data analysis and reporting. Public health agencies using OSCAR or similar health information systems can use this to consolidate data collection.

How to build

First go get all dependencies This package includes three tools (Go build them separately from the cmd folder):

Fhirpost: The application for posting the csv fie to the FHIR server

Serverfhir: A simple FHIR server for testing (requires mongodb). We recommend using PHIS-DW for production.

Report: A simple application for descriptive statistics on the csv file

Format of the CSV file


Using vocabulary such as SNOMED for field names in the E-Form is very useful for consolidated analysis.

Each record should have:

demographicNo → The patient ID
dateCreated
efmfid → The ID of the eform
fdid → The ID of the each form field.
(The Eform export csv of OSCAR typically has all these fields and requires no further processing)

Mapping

  • Bundle with unique patients. All columns mapped to observations.
  • Submitter mapped to Practitioner.
  • Document type bundle with composition as the first entry
  • Unique fullUrls are generated.
  • PatientID is location + demographicNo
  • Budle of 1 composition, 1 practitioner, 1 or more patients, and many observations
  • Validates with R4 schema

How to use:

  • Change the settings in .env
  • You can compile this for Windows, Mac or Linux. Check the fhirmap.go file and make any desired changes. You should be able to figure out the mapping rules from this file.
  • It reads data.csv file from the same folder by default. (can be specified by the -file commandline argument: fhirpost -file=data.csv)
  • Start mongodb and run server and fhirpost in separate windows for testing.
  • On windows, you can just double-click executables to run. (Closes automatically after run)

Privacy and security:
This application does not encrypt the data. Use it only in a secure network.

Disclaimer:
This is an experimental application. Use it at your own risk.

Categories
Information Systems OpenSource

OSCAR EMR and FHIR

OSCAR (Open Source Clinical Application and Resource) EMR is a web-based electronic medical record (EMR) system initially developed for primary care clinics in Canada. Oscar is a Java spring based web application with a relatively old codebase. OSCAR is widely used in the provinces of Ontario and British Columbia and is supported by many Oscar service providers.

Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) is an HL7 standard describing data schema and a RESTful API for health information exchange. FHIR is fast emerging as the de-facto standard for interoperability between health information systems because of its simplicity and the use of existing web standards such as REST.

OSCAR being primarily designed for primary care clinics does not support interoperability with other systems out of the box. FHIR in its entirety is not supported by OSCAR. A partial implementation of FHIR to support the immunization dataflow as FHIR bundles is available. One of the requests that constantly pops up in the OSCAR community is the need for a full FHIR API implementation for OSCAR.

We had some initial discussions on how to go about implementing a FHIR API for OSCAR EMR. FHIR is a REST API exposing FHIR Resources such as Patients, Observations and CarePlan as JSON resources. The HAPI-FHIR java library defines all the FHIR resources and the associated functions. The first step in building the API is to map the relatively messy OSCAR data model to FHIR resources. The Patient resource has been mapped and is available in the OSCAR repository. This (/src/main/java/org/oscarehr/integration/fhir/model/Patient.java) can be used as the template to map other required resources.

The next step is to extend the REST API that is currently available to expose FHIR APIs after authentication. If you have some ideas/expertise/interest in this, please comment below.

Categories
HIS

Public Health Data Warehouse on FHIR

The Ontario government is building a connected health care system centred around patients, families and caregivers through the newly established Ontario Health Teams (OHT). As disparate healthcare and public health teams move towards a unified structure, there is a growing need to reconsider our information system strategy. Most off the shelf solutions are pricey, while open-source solutions such as DHIS2 is not popular in Canada. Some of the public health units have existing systems, and it will be too resource-intensive to switch to another system. The interoperability challenge needs an innovative solution, beyond finding the single, provincial EMR.

artificial intelligence

We have written about the theoretical aspects, especially the need to envision public health information systems separate from an EMR. In this working paper, we propose a maturity model for PHIS and offer some pragmatic recommendations for dealing with the common challenges faced by public health teams. 

Below is a demo project on GitHub from the data-intel lab that showcases a potential solution for a scalable data warehouse for health information system integration. Public health databases are vital for the community for efficient planning, surveillance and effective interventions. Public health data needs to be integrated at various levels for effective policymaking. PHIS-DW adopts FHIR as the data model for storage with the integrated Elasticsearch stack. Kibana provides the visualization engine. PHIS-DW can support complex algorithms for disease surveillance such as machine learning methods, hidden Markov models, and Bayesian to multivariate analytics. PHIS-DW is work in progress and code contributions are welcome. We intend to use Bunsen to integrate PHIS-DW with Apache Spark for big data applications. 

Public Health Data Warehouse Framework on FHIR

FHIR has some advantages as a data persistence schema for public health. Apart from its popularity, the FHIR bundle makes it possible to send observations to FHIR servers without the associated patient resource, thereby ensuring reasonable privacy. This is especially useful in the surveillance of pandemics such as COVID19. Some useful yet complicated integrations with OSCAR EMR and DHIS2 is under consideration. If any of the OHTs find our approach interesting, give us a shout. 

BTW, have you seen Drishti, our framework for FHIR based behavioural intervention? 

Categories
HIS

Drishti | An Open mHealth sense-plan-act framework based on FHIR!

Originally published by Bell Eapen at nuchange.ca on August 13, 2019. If you have some feedback, reach out to the author on TwitterLinkedIn  or  Github.

TL;DRHere is an open-source mHealth framework based on FHIR! and here is the paper and my presentation at ICSE!

Pervasive health monitoring is becoming less and less intrusive with better sensors, and more and more useful with machine learning and predictive analytics.

MHealth (mobile health) could play an important part in pervasive health monitoring. It is difficult for clinicians to efficiently use the data from disparate apps that do not communicate with each other. For example, if a clinician has to monitor a patient’s blood sugar, blood pressure and physical activity, the clinician may have to check data from multiple apps. Another challenge is the difficulty in communicating clinical requirements to app developers and it is difficult to test and approve the clinical validity of these apps. Besides, there are always privacy and security concerns with personal health information.

Open mHealth is a framework introduced to manage the problem of interoperability between apps. It is an open-source project. Open mHealth project provides interfaces for cloud services such as GoogleFit and Fitbit and converts the data into a common data format. BIT model deals with the communication problem between clinicians and developers during app development. Drishti incorporates Open mHealth framework into the BIT model using FHIR as the common data model.

The BIT model is based on the Sense-Plan-Act paradigm from robotics. The BIT model encourages conceptualizing mHealth apps as three distinct components: Profilers that sense data on various physiological parameters such as blood pressure, planners that create a clinical intervention plan and actors that deliver the plan to the users as alerts or messages on their mobile devices. Drishti adopts the BIT model as a design model with all components sharing a central data repository. Drishti makes sharing of information with the doctors easy, by integrating it into an EMR. The central data repository also makes big data applications possible.

The central data repository in Drishti uses FHIR schema for storage. FHIR is a schema for health data created by HL7 that defines ‘Resources’ that can be exchanged as json or xml using RESTful interfaces. Resources support 80% of common use cases and the rest can be supported using extensions. For example, age and gender are defined for a Patient resource, while skin type that is not commonly used is defined through an extension if required. Drishti uses the ‘Observation’ resource for storing data from profilers and the ‘CarePlan’ resource for the planner and actor components.

Open mHealth is the profiler in Drishti. All data from the various cloud services are converted to FHIR Observations and stored in the Drishti-Cog. The Drishti-Planner can take data stored in the cog and create a careplan and the actor can deliver it to the patient. Drishti uses OpenMRS EMR for managing access, both for clinicians and patients. We have developed an OpenMRS module for integration with Drishti. The javascript visualization library called hGraph provides a consolidated view of the data pulled from sensors to the clinician.

In the current implementation, the cog is a FHIR server based on the HAPI java library. Planner and actor components are just stubs that can be extended for several use cases. The planner is a python flask app and the viewer is a Vue App that can be used as a native mobile app. Both are templates that can be extended. The entire stack is available on GitHub along with pre-built Docker containers for quick prototyping.

Here is a typical use case. Depression is a common mental health problem, characterized by loss of interest in activities that you normally enjoy. Patients with depression are typically treated with anti-depressant drugs. The clinicians need to track the patient’s activity to assess progress along with medication compliance. The patient can use an activity tracker app and a medication tracker app, both sending data to the cog as FHIR observations. The clinicians can have a consolidated view in their EMR and create alerts or messages (plan) that can be delivered to the patient’s mobile device. The interventions can also be created by AI systems.

Drishti was presented at Software Engineering in Healthcare conference in Montreal and selected for FHIR devdays. Please cite Drishti as below:

Bell Raj Eapen, Norm Archer, Kamran Sartipi, and Yufei Yuan. 2019. Drishti: a sense-plan-act extension to open mHealth framework using FHIR. In Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Software Engineering for Healthcare (SEH ’19). IEEE Press, Piscataway, NJ, USA, 49-52. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1109/SEH.2019.00016